Scotland’s Mesmerizing Fairy Pools

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Most visitors to the Isle of Skye plan to visit the popular Fairy Pools. And you should too! Rain or shine, I was going. And it was mesmerizing to say the least.

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After leaving the parking lot and walking the trail a little ways, you come to a gushing river crossing with three slippery rocks overflowing with water that you must cross in order to proceed. First thought. Now, what could possibly go wrong here? Yes, it is treacherous! After searching for some time for another way across and studying the strategy of others in how to do it without falling, we said: “Let’s go! Make it quick and get it over with!” Thankfully, we escaped a fall and were on our way. Though on our way back, it was sad to see one young person down while the Mountain Rescue team was making its way down the trail to carry him out. Here’s a thought. How about a small bridge instead of  rocks covered in gushing water? Or is there no fun in that?

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After the treacherous water crossing, the rest is easy. It is a moderate walk—with good hiking boots—amid beautiful glistening pools of water and ominous mountains lurking behind.

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When we got to the end of the Fairy Pools, my husband naturally wanted to keep going despite the sign.

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So we continued on a little further until the only way to continue was to wade through water. Seeing the rain clouds coming and being the mountain “experts” that we are, we decided it would be best to make our way back. After all, we still had to cross the treacherous rocks at the end.

For more information on the Fairy Pools, located near the village of Carbost on the road to Glen Brittle at the foot of the Black Cuillins, the Isle of Skye.com has a wealth of information.

À bientôt!

Scotland’s Captivating Isle of Skye

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Filled with raw, rugged, breathtaking landscapes, this 50-mile-long island is one of the largest of Scotland. Voted as the fourth best island in the world by National Geographic, the Isle of Skye is a hiker’s paradise. Just ask the Munro baggers—hikers who are striving to climb all 282 Munros, mountains that are over 3,000 feet. From majestic mountains to breathtaking waterfalls to the sea, the lochs, and the moors, the scenery is dramatic to say the least. This isle of beauty is a photographer’s dream.

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We were told by a local: “You don’t come to Scotland for the weather!” And to that, we have to add: “That’s why you go to Provence!” Though it does rain nearly every day on the isle, the weather can change every five minutes. One minute it may be raining and the next the sun is shining, at least for a few minutes. We had no trouble in the month of October, as it mostly rained only during the night or in the early morning hours. Rain was quickly replaced by spectacular rainbows, and the sheep didn’t seem to mind.

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Driving for hours a day around the isle seemed like minutes as we were captivated by the spectacular scenery. Although at one point, I did have to wonder where in the world we were when the sign said we were entering Sleat peninsula. Here is an introduction to Skye.

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À bientôt!